Killing Eve author Luke Jennings shares his thoughts on finale

Jodie Comer and Sandra Oh in Killing Eve

Jodie Comer and Sandra Oh in Killing Eve
Image: David Emery/BBCA

[As the headline suggests, this piece contains spoilers from Killing Eve’s series finale.]

BBC’s Killing Eve got here to its stunning and divisive finish on April 10, with a finale episode that bows to the dreadful “bury your gays” trope. The finale infuriated not solely followers and critics, but additionally Luke Jennings, the author who penned the trilogy that impressed the present.

“As an author, it’s a thrill having your work tailored for TV, as my Killing Eve novels have been. You’re by no means going to like every thing the screenwriting group does, that’s a given,” Jennings writes in a column for The Guardian.

“It’s a rare privilege to see your characters delivered to life so compellingly,” he continues, “But the ultimate collection ending took me aback.”

For extra context, after 4 seasons of a murderous recreation of cat-and-mouse, the “will they, gained’t they” stress lastly breaks down between employed murderer Villanelle (Jodie Comer) and intelligence investigator Eve (Sandra Oh)—the 2 share a kiss, solidifying their relationship. However, this honeymoon interval is short-lived as Villanelle is then gunned down in a river as she and Eve attempt to escape. Her physique sinks right down to the underside, and isn’t seen once more by her paramour.

“We have adopted their romance for 3 and a half years. The charged appears, the tears, the lovingly fetishized wounds, the endlessly deferred consummation,” Jennings writes. “When Phoebe Waller-Bridge and I first mentioned Villanelle’s character 5 years in the past, we agreed that she was outlined by what Phoebe referred to as her “glory”: her subversiveness, her savage energy, her insistence on beautiful issues. That’s the Villanelle that I wrote, that Phoebe become a display character, and that Jodie ran with so gloriously.”

Sandra Oh and Jodie Comer in Killing Eve

Sandra Oh and Jodie Comer in Killing Eve
Image: David Emery/BBCA

While Killing Eve is much from the primary tv collection to make the most of this overwrought trope (it’s been used in The 100, Doctor Who, and Buffy The Vampire Slayer, simply to call just a few), it’s at all times a disappointment to see trendy writers lack creativity past “annnnnnnnnd she dies.” Some have rightfully identified that this case differs somewhat, as Villanelle herself was a vicious assassin. However, she nonetheless didn’t obtain a dying worthy of her character, as is often the case.

“The season 4 ending was a bowing to conference. A punishing of Villanelle and Eve for the bloody, erotically impelled chaos they’ve brought on. A really subversive storyline would have defied the trope which sees same-sex lovers in TV dramas permitted solely probably the most fleeting of relationships earlier than certainly one of them is killed off,” Jennings writes. “How rather more darkly satisfying, and true to Killing Eve’s unique spirit, for the couple to stroll off into the sundown collectively? Spoiler alert, however that’s the way it appeared to me when writing the books.”

For Jennings, whereas Killing Eve could also be over, it’s not the tip of the Villanelle.

“I realized the result of the ultimate episode upfront, and suspected, rightly, that followers can be upset. But to these followers, I’d say this: Villanelle lives. And on the web page, if not on the display, she will probably be again.”

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